The Peabody Awards

The Peabody Awards

Awards


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  • “4 the Family” Project
    1987
    “4 the Family” Project

    In its Peabody entry WSMV TV, Nashville, said, in part: “The American family faces many challenges and at times it seems traditional family life may become extinct. But a healthy, happy family is the core of our society and that’s why WSMV is devoted to this project.” The project involved the use of more than a million-and-a-half dollars of air time for programming and public service announcements with a family theme. Using the title 4 The Family and utilizing the talents of many staff members WSMV TV succeeded, in a superb effort, to focus the attention of its viewers on... read more

  • “Ryan Martin” as presented on “Weekend Edition”
    1987
    “Ryan Martin” as presented on “Weekend Edition”

    Ryan Martin is a 13-year-old boy who was shot in the back and subsequently confined to a wheelchair. While many similar stories focus exclusively on the tragedy of such an event, this story reveals Ryan Martin’s triumph and his adaptation to a new way of life. This excellent program illustrates that even though the body can be crippled, the mind can overcome the limitations of the body. Ryan’s family is also brought into the piece and their support is crucial to his success. Reporter John Hockenberry, similarly confined to a wheelchair, is able to understand the issues that the less... read more

  • AIDS and You
    1987
    AIDS and You

    In the past four years the spread of the AIDS virus has variously engendered hysteria, homophobia, ignorance and misinformation. What has often been missing in the media has been direct, straightforward discussion about how the disease is acquired and prevented. AIDS and You provides precisely this kind of public service for the citizens of Vancouver. In sparse, effective narration, writer and host Linden Soles provides specific information about the etiology and treatment of the disease. The graphics and animation explain rather than confuse. Most importantly, viewers are provided social and behavioral models to emulate. Here, “safe sex” is more than... read more

  • America Undercover: Drunk and Deadly
    1987
    America Undercover: Drunk and Deadly

    More than 50,000 Americans die on the highways each year and experts estimate that more than half of these deaths are alcohol-related. But numbers can be numbing and the number 50,000 becomes an abstraction rather than a reality. In Drunk and Deadly, accidents from a selected day are examined from the human angle so that the individual victims are made real to the viewer. Then the reality is compounded and made more tragic by adding cases one to the other so that the net experience is a true understanding of the impact of a number like 50,000. Ann Hassett and... read more

  • American Tongues
    1987
    American Tongues

    As most of us know, the Peabody speaks with a Southern accent. But what exactly does that mean? Are we dim-witted or indolent? Instead, as we like to think, we may really be thoughtful, considerate and reasonable.American Tongues reveals with insight, candor and humor that the way we speak says much about us and about those who would judge us. Included in this lively examination of accents and regionalisms are the unique speech patterns of Boston Brahmins and North-enders; “Brooklyn-ese” and Black English; Appalachian “hillbilly” and Texas twang. In the end, the fast-paced hour indicates, that, despite our attempt to... read more

  • Charities That Give and Take
    1987
    Charities That Give and Take

    In the opinion of the Peabody Board, Charities That Give and Take was among the best of a number of excellent radio documentaries produced by Mutual in 1987. This is an intensive inquiry into the collection and disbursement of funds collected in recent “superstar” fundraising events. Spanning the globe from New York to London to Ethiopia, correspondent Paul Henderson, executive producer Craig Warner and producer Doug Levy conducted interviews and examined financial records in order to trace the flow of money and aid from donor to beneficiary. The result, presented in a 22-minute documentary as well as a series of... read more

  • Corridos! Tales of Passion and Revolution
    1987
    Corridos! Tales of Passion and Revolution

    In its deliberations this year, the Peabody Board noted two elements of American television which seem to be disappearing. The first is the spirit of exuberant entertainment: music, drama and dance performed with obvious passion and pleasure. The second is the artistic use of the television studio, the overwhelming majority of entries having been shot on location. Corridos! Tales of Passion and Revolution counters both trends and celebrates our rich Hispanic heritage. A completely new staging for television of El Teatro Campesino’s acclaimed stage production, Corridos! brings to life the ballads of border life in the early twentieth century. Performers... read more

  • Deadly Mistakes
    1987
    Deadly Mistakes

    Deadly Mistakes is the story of how inaccurate lab readings led people to believe they were free of cancer when they were not. Others underwent unnecessary surgery for diseases they did not have. The results ranged from psychological trauma to death. WRC-TV, Washington, has provided a real public service in examining the laboratory errors and, more importantly, in revealing some of the reasons behind such errors. In most cases the errors could have easily been avoided if acceptable procedures had been followed. Lea Thompson and Rick Nelson have also taken the extra step by suggesting a plan of action in... read more

  • Drake Hospital Investigation
    1987
    Drake Hospital Investigation

    The Drake Hospital Investigation, in the opinion of members of the Peabody Board, is an example of investigative reporting at its best. An able news department at WCPO-TV in Cincinnati, headed by news director Jack Calahan, spent two-and-a-half months looking into a series of questionable deaths at Drake Hospital. None of these deaths had been targeted for investigation by local law enforcement authorities. Executive news producer Ed Wilson and anchor/reporter/managing editor Pat Minarcin formed the team that investigated, wrote and produced this outstanding journalistic effort. Graphics and excellent photography made the facts understandable. A conviction resulted. For exceptional service to... read more

  • Earnest Will: Americans in the Gulf
    1987
    Earnest Will: Americans in the Gulf

    It is becoming increasingly rare when the immediate and dramatic impact of radio is fully realized. The sheer power of the spoken word and the sound of the environment from which it springs can command the audience in a manner unmatched by the visual media. Such is the case with Earnest Will: Americans in the Gulf. Correspondent Jon Bascom takes the listener into the dramatic and dangerous tanker escort mission in the Persian Gulf. The listener experiences firsthand the minutes of the mundanity of life aboard ship interrupted by moments of peril and excitement. When the tanker Bridgeton strikes a... read more

  • Eyes on the Prize: America’s Civil Rights Years
    1987
    Eyes on the Prize: America’s Civil Rights Years

    Eyes on the Prize is a comprehensive compilation and analysis of the events comprising the American civil rights movement. It shows the movement in “big picture” terms as well as delving into specific occurrences such as the integration of Little Rock’s Central High School. In doing so, the program shows us where we are as a country and how we got here. It takes two decades of turmoil and weaves a comprehensible tapestry that makes sense of it all. Viewers also see original footage of the stalwarts of the movement like Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr.; his wife, Coretta Scott... read more

  • Inside Bridgewater
    1987
    Inside Bridgewater

    One of the great things about living in the United States is enjoyment of the freedom our radio and television stations and our newspapers have to investigate problem areas which may affect the public. More than a year ago the news department of WCVB-TV, Boston, began to look behind the closed doors of the Massachusetts State Hospital for the Criminally Insane (“Bridgewater,” as it is commonly known.) What they found was reflected in an intensive series of special reports that documented many of the things going on inside the Bridgewater walls. As a result of this investigation many citizens of... read more

  • Institutional Award: Cable News Network (CNN) for Coverage of the Stock Market Crash
    1987
    Institutional Award: Cable News Network (CNN) for Coverage of the Stock Market Crash

    Peabody recognition goes to the Cable News Network for its excellence in live coverage of important breaking news stories. No finer example of this excellence can be found, in the opinion of the Peabody Board, than CNN’s live coverage of the October 1987 stock market crash. Under the guidance of Chief Correspondent and Vice President, CNN Business News, Lou Dobbs an outstanding team covered this event with such distinction and care that the Board recognizes CNN as the “channel of record” for live coverage of breaking news of national and global significance. For its overall effort, but with special recognition... read more

  • Institutional Award: CBS Television and Hallmark Hall of Fame
    1987
    Institutional Award: CBS Television and Hallmark Hall of Fame

    The name Hallmark Hall of Fame has come to symbolize excellence of the highest order in the presentation of dramatic programs on television—in this case CBS Television. First recognized with a Peabody in 1957, Hallmark is singled out this time as an acknowledgement of the continuing excellence of this landmark series which brings the highest quality drama to the American public. The Board wishes to give special public recognition to two programs which signify the kind of excellence for which the award is given: Foxfire and Pack of Lies. Foxfire produced by Marian Rees Associates, with Dorothea Petrie as producer,... read more

  • Institutional Award: KPAL Radio for Overall Programming for Children
    1987
    Institutional Award: KPAL Radio for Overall Programming for Children

    Many people have asked, in the past few years, whatever happened to children’s radio? Well, it is alive, well and thriving in Little Rock, Arkansas, in the form of K-PAL Radio, a station which offers up poetry, stories, music, and features for the very young. Through such programs as Perfectly Legal (legal issues for the young), An Apple A Day (health), Kids in the Kitchen (food), and Meet Our Leaders, K-PAL helps its young listeners to stay informed as well as entertained. Tish Henslee, Harriett D’Agrosa and the team at K-PAL have offered an alternative programming format that just may... read more

  • Japan Series
    1987
    Japan Series

    Economics is a difficult topic for both reporters and television viewers; the complex terminology and stuffy “authorities” often make for much of television’s worst moments. The MacNeil/Lehrer NewsHour seems to have found the key to the successful reporting of economics in their Japan Series. Paul Solman, their business/economic correspondent, went to Japan to tape a comprehensive report on that country’s method of dealing with business and the economy he made no boring predictions, gave no pretentious market reports. Instead, he introduced the Japanese economic mindset by contrasting Japanese and American baseball, supermarkets and small businesses. The result was a fast-paced,... read more

  • L.A. Law
    1987
    L.A. Law

    L.A. Law has become, in a very short time, more than just another television show. The gripping and touching dramas, characterized by excellent writing, direction, and acting, have captured the imagination of critics and casual television viewers alike. In a genre too often dominated by chase scenes and gratuitous violence, L.A. Law proves that good stories about human and humane characters are more than enough to capture viewers. The visions of Steven Bochco and Terry Louise Fisher have produced a series in which the sensitive treatment of a mentally disabled character (Benny) can be successfully interwoven into the chaotic and... read more

  • LBJ: The Early Years
    1987
    LBJ: The Early Years

    A few years ago, the Peabody Board offered advice to program producers about some of the perils of docudrama. The ability of this dramatic form to invent character traits, to restage events, and thereby to rewrite history was cited as being particularly, dangerous. The Board called on the artistic community to exercise great care in the production of docudramas. LBJ: The Early Years serves as a model for fulfilling the obligations of the docu-dramatist. Under the careful guidance of Executive Producer Louis Rudolph, Producers John Brice and Sandra Saxon Brice, and the directional excellence of Peter Werner, LBJ: The Early... read more

  • Mandela
    1987
    Mandela

    The year 1987 marked the 25th year of the imprisonment of Nelson Mandela by the South African government. He was charged with high treason, but his real crime may have been his desire to live in a country where all people have equal opportunity. Over the years the voice of Nelson Mandela has grown louder, not softer, and his cry for freedom has been taken up by countless others, not only in his own country but around the world. Beyond this, his wife Winnie has developed into an articulate spokesperson for the freedom movement in South Africa. Titus Productions in... read more

  • Nature: A Season in the Sun
    1987
    Nature: A Season in the Sun

    A Season in the Sun is truly a work of art, a masterpiece that shows the textures and flavors of the East African landscape, making that landscape live and breathe. The program is characterized by exceptional attention to detail in writing, in sound, and in the breathtaking visuals. It is so beautifully photographed that each scene could likely be framed and displayed as art. But this art was collected with some cost and considerable danger. The husband and wife team of Alan and Joan Root faced near-death from dehydration during the filing of the piece as the drought affected them... read more

  • NOVA: Spy Machines
    1987
    NOVA: Spy Machines

    Simply by tracing the history of aerial reconnaissance in the United States, Spy Machines neatly recounts the key events of the Cold War and looks into the future of American/Soviet SDI competition. The strong, fast-paced script begins with Civil War spy balloons and goes up to state-of-the-art satellite technology. Still it never becomes too technical and it always maintains historical perspective. The body of the show seamlessly blends old footage with recent interviews involving key players, while the conclusion incorporates some truly dazzling computer-generated effects. For a clear, comprehensive look at an intriguing subject that maintains a sense of awe... read more

  • Of Violence and Victims
    1987
    Of Violence and Victims

    When the crime rate in Nashville took a significant jump of fifteen percent while the rate in other Tennessee cities remained stable—or actually declined—WSM Radio’s able news department headed by Jerry Dahmen, wanted to find out why. The resulting project culminated in a 15-part series, Of Violence and Victims. Subsequently the mayor, the chief of police and others in authority launched a drive to intercept drug shipments. A cash award program was instituted. For making a significant impact on the community by means of radio, a Peabody to WSM Radio.... read more

  • Personal Award: Karl Haas
    1987
    Personal Award: Karl Haas

    For Karl Haas this is a second Peabody Award. His Adventures in Good Music may well be America’s most listened-to good music radio program. More than 150 stations broadcast the daily series in this country and it is carried overseas by the Armed Forces Radio Network and in Australia on ABC’s National Network. But listenership alone doesn’t denote the quality of Karl Haas’ contribution to radio. He has been known also as a distinguished musician and educator. For almost a third of a century the name Karl Haas has been synonymous with excellence in the presentation of music by radio.... read more

  • Personal Awards: Kevin Brownlow and David Gill
    1987
    Personal Awards: Kevin Brownlow and David Gill

    Itself the keeper of one of the richest archives of visual history, the Peabody Awards program appreciates the dedication of those who seek to protect our film and television heritage against the ravages of age, natural calamity and human short-sightedness. At the forefront of that battle are two Britons, Kevin Brownlow and David Gill. In the past seven years, they have painstakingly found, restored and compiled into masterworks for Thames Television vast treasures of the silent cinema. The centerpieces are Unknown Chaplin, which won a 1986 Peabody, Buster Keaton: A Hard Act to Follow, and Hollywood, the definitive record of... read more

  • Safe Haven
    1987
    Safe Haven

    Anti-Semitism in domestic and foreign policy. Internment of families in crowded camps circled by barbed wire. Nazi Germany? No. These words describe American actions which led to the imprisonment at Fort Ontario in upstate New York of nearly 1000 refugees from Hitler’s Europe in 1944 and 1945. In an exceptional locally-produced documentary narrated by actor Robert Clary (himself a former refugee), the program tells a story of callousness, hatred and bureaucratic malaise which is a blot on the American conscience. Executive producer Christopher Zimmerman and producer/director Paul Lewis are to be congratulated for making a particularly timely statement about the... read more

  • Shoah
    1987
    Shoah

    In its deliberations the Peabody Board rarely uses the term “masterpiece.” In the discussion of Shoah, however, this word was heard around the table. Shockingly, today there are individuals and groups who claim that the Holocaust never happened. For its six million victims, Jew and gentile, there is no more important task than to dismiss this fraud with testimony both by those who suffered and those who administered the suffering. Few can match the commitment of director Claude Lanzmann. For eleven years, in fourteen countries he found and interviewed Jewish survivors of the death camps, Nazi overseers, and the farmers... read more

  • Small Happiness: Women of a Chinese Village
    1987
    Small Happiness: Women of a Chinese Village

    While the crack in the Great Wall has widened in the wake of “ping-pong diplomacy,” what has been missing is a detailed examination of the daily life and customs of Chinese culture. This is precisely what is provided by Small Happiness: Women of a Chinese Village. Carma Hinton, an American born and raised in China, makes use of more than ten years experience to earn the trust and confidence of women in a rural farming village, far from the realm of “official” statements and staged events. The result is a multifaceted inquiry into the persistent sexism of Chinese society, despite... read more

  • Some Place Like Home
    1987
    Some Place Like Home

    Some Place Like Home is a moving account of what can happen to AIDS victims when they reach the point of last resort. Shunned by friends, society, and sometimes by family and medical establishments, they can find humane treatment in hospice centers where the emphasis is not on the disease but on the person. This is less a story about AIDS than it is a testament to the humanity of hospice workers and supportive family members. In the hospice environment patients find acceptance and a degree of dignity they might not have thought possible. Laurel Erickson has done an extraordinary... read more

  • Star Trek: The Next Generation, The Big Good-Bye
    1987
    Star Trek: The Next Generation, The Big Good-Bye

    Star Trek has been part of the American television fabric for more than two decades. An attempt to make Star Trek: The Next Generation live up to the considerable reputation of the original was complicated by the fact that it would appear, not on the networks, but in first-run syndication. Rather than give in to the usual realities of “first-run"and produce a low budget, but profitable program, the producers chose instead to opt for the highest quality in writing, decor, acting, and, indeed, all facets of the production. In doing so, they have set a new standard of quality for... read more