The Peabody Awards

The Peabody Awards

Awards


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  • Experiment in Television
    1969
    Experiment in Television

    This series exemplifies the breadth of television as an art form. Among the past year’s productions were three original plays: A film by and about Federico Fellini-his first venture into television; and an unorthodox documentary on “Pinter People,” a striking feature of which was highly sophisticated animation paraphrased by filmed street scenes of London today. The productions are inventive, imaginative, and original in concept and execution and immensely stimulating. In recognition of the high level of purpose and achievement, the George Foster Peabody Award for television entertainment. The Cube, season 3 episode 3 of Experiment in Television, aired... read more

  • Higher Horizons
    1969
    Higher Horizons

    In programming and community services, station WLIB demonstrates high dedication to aiding black youth to find jobs, to stay in school, and, through Higher Horizons, to obtain a college education. Each week, colleges and universities presented their programs, their requirements, and their special opportunities for disadvantaged you with gratifying response from aspiring young Negroes. In recognition, a Peabody Award for radio public service.... read more

  • Institutional Award: Voice of America for Promotion of International Understanding
    1969
    Institutional Award: Voice of America for Promotion of International Understanding

    While the major purpose of the Voice of America is “to help achieve United States foreign policy objectives,” it also contributes markedly toward better understanding of this nation, its people and its culture. It secures its largest global audiences with outstanding coverage of such spectacular American scientific achievements as flight of the Apollo XI. It regularly services most of the world in 36 languages with news and American viewpoints. And it provides contact with American personalities and cultural manifestations through Music USA, New York, New York, and the coverage of sports and special cultural happenings. In recognition, a Peabody Award... read more

  • J.T.
    1969
    J.T.

    A program created by CBS Television especially for young people that combined highly creative and imaginative writing and superb production. A landmark in children’s television programming filled with extraordinary insight and compassion. In recognition for writing and children’s programming, a Peabody Award.... read more

  • Newsroom
    1969
    Newsroom

    The reporting of news is television’s most vital function-and also its most familiar stereotype. The nation’s liveliest exception is KQED’s Newsroom, a nightly, non-commercial hour which permits the reporter to tell his story with emphasis on background and significance rather than simply on what happened. It is unconventional, innovative, and highly considerate of the viewer’s intelligence. In recognition, a Peabody Award for television news.... read more

  • On Trial: The Man in the Middle
    1969
    On Trial: The Man in the Middle

    With exceptional skill and understanding of the use of radio as a medium for relating the audience to the performer, Second Sunday has few equals. For this program, On Trial: The Man In the Middle, a departure from the usual format was made to stage a court trial. The person on trial is the symbol for the generation in America of the 1960s—the Silent Majority. He is John Doe, age 50, a suburban homeowner who works in a large city. His three college-age children are the plaintiffs. The jury, which is the radio audience, listens both to the prosecution and... read more

  • Personal Award: Bing Crosby
    1969
    Personal Award: Bing Crosby

    Legendary figure in American broadcasting for over four decades, an early radio celebrity, heard through the sale of 300,000,000 recordings, seen in 58 major movies, now shown frequently on television, durable television star, the pioneer of televised golf classics, a philanthropist through millions given to youth and public causes. A Peabody Award to a broadcasting personality beloved around the world.... read more

  • Personal Award: Chet Huntley
    1969
    Personal Award: Chet Huntley

    A Special Peabody Award to Chet Huntley for his major and always dependable contribution to radio and television for over 35 years. Chet has characterized himself as “an informed straight man,” but this says too little about his courage, his cheerful sense of proportion, and the scorn or skepticism he can convey by inflection or by the lift of an eyebrow. He has served all three major networks and his bravest, loneliest stand was in Los Angeles during the poisoned years of Senator Joseph McCarthy. He has lifted our morale at the grimmest moments and his partnership with David Brinkley... read more

  • Personal Award: Curt Gowdy
    1969
    Personal Award: Curt Gowdy

    With sports occupying an increasing significance in broadcasting, Curt Gowdy merits recognition as television’s most versatile sportscaster. Over the years, Mr. Gowdy has achieved top stature with a winning blend of reportorial accuracy, a vast fund of knowledge in many areas, intelligence, good humor and an infectiously honest enthusiasm for his subject. Curt Gowdy stands today at the top of his profession. In recognition, a Peabody Award for television entertainment.... read more

  • Personal Award: Frank Reynolds
    1969
    Personal Award: Frank Reynolds

    Frank Reynolds, after a career of many years as a hard-core newsman and reporter, became in 1968 an anchorman of ABC Evening News, which he shares five nights each week with his distinguished colleague, Peabody Award winner Howard K. Smith. Thus a fresh and engaging personality has emerged as a genuine major leaguer. Besides organizing, writing and planning this nightly news show, Frank Reynolds adds trenchant and pertinent commentary which is clearly labeled as such. Consistently such commentaries are finely wrought jewels of precision—provocative and stimulating to listeners, reflecting a unique insight on the issues of the day and giving... read more

  • Personal Award: Tom Pettit
    1969
    Personal Award: Tom Pettit

    Tom Pettit, a writer-producer for NBC News, has brought a strong dimension to investigative reporting on television, an area hitherto largely unfulfilled. Incisive, accurate and probing, Pettit has filed many noteworthy reports for his network. One special report on chemical warfare brought about a congressional investigation into national policies in that regard. In recognition, a Peabody Award for network television public service.... read more

  • Sesame Street
    1969
    Sesame Street

    Where millions of pre-school age children gather for enchanted hours of an ultra-modern version of readin’, ‘ritin’, and ‘rithmetic’—a product of color television’s most research, pre-tested program—utilizing such devices as puppets, animated cartoons, films, celebrities, as well as its regular residents and talented director, Mrs. Joan Ganz Cooney. Backed by several major corporations concerned with the need for new approaches to the training of young children—carried over major educational stations- it has clearly demonstrated what thoughtful, imaginative, creative educators are doing for tomorrows leadership.... read more

  • The Advocates
    1969
    The Advocates

    To station WGBH of Boston and station WCET of Los Angeles, a Peabody Award for The Advocates, a 39-week series of bold, invigorating debates of crucial issues carried over the National Educational Television Network. It was the belief of the executive editor, Roger Fisher, that in a courtroom atmosphere such controversial problems as abortion, smog versus the auto, the use of marijuana, or the danger of offshore drilling could be dramatized and reasonably, if hotly, discussed; it was the responsibility of Gregory Harney, the executive producer of The Advocates, to confront the viewer with the contending points of view and... read more

  • The Japanese
    1969
    The Japanese

    In the field of international understanding: With former U.S. Ambassador Edwin 0. Reischauer as the narrator, The Japanese, a CBS Special, emerged as a thoughtful, enlightening program and an important bridge linking two peoples with different cultures and perspectives. In recognition, a George Foster Peabody Award for television promotion of international understanding.... read more

  • The Negro In Indianapolis
    1969
    The Negro In Indianapolis

    A series of programs based on an extensive research project to study the divergent perceptions of the Negro and the white man in Indianapolis and the impact made by television on the community in relation to civil unrest. This research and resultant programs have contributed greatly to a meaningful dialogue between the races and have helped promote continued racial harmony in Indianapolis. For concern and leadership in meeting this challenge, a Peabody Award for television public service.... read more

  • When Will It End?
    1969
    When Will It End?

    A significant illustration of radio used to investigate and report on community problems in the interest of finding an equitable solution to these problems. In recognition, a Peabody Award for radio news.... read more

  • Who Killed Lake Erie
    1969
    Who Killed Lake Erie

    This vivid television essay is the reporter at his best as an educator. A project of NBC News, Who Killed Lake Erieboth inspired and intensified national awareness of the grave national pollution crisis. Selecting Lake Erie as a spectacular, but to be expected, result of apathy, arrogance, ignorance and willful neglect, the program emphasizes we are all its murderers. Now available as a teaching tool in a dozen central university film libraries, Who Killed Lake Erie has also been so used by Congressional Committees and state executive and pollution control authorities. In recognition of an outstanding use of reportorial skills... read more