The Peabody Awards

The Peabody Awards

Awards


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  • CBS Reports
    1964
    CBS Reports

    In a year when the intelligent, adult television audience has been consistently short-changed by networks wooing teenagers, CBS Reports stands out as a heartening exception to the trend. Judicious selection of material, first-rate editing, and superb production have been the hallmarks of every CBS Reports program. The Peabody Board singles out for special mention as a highlight of the series, the interview with Walter Lippmann that was televised on April 8, 1964.... read more

  • Institutional Award: Intertel (Council of the International Television Federation) for Contribution to International Understanding
    1964
    Institutional Award: Intertel (Council of the International Television Federation) for Contribution to International Understanding

    In the fragile field of international cooperation and understanding, a strong bond has been formed by the documentaries produced by the five-year-old Council of the International Television Federation, known as Intertel, which links the English-speaking nations through the Australian Broadcasting Corporation, the Canadian Broadcasting Corporation, Britain’s Rediffusion TV Ltd., and, in America, the Westinghouse Broadcasting Company and National Educational Television. By sharing these special programs which focus on contemporary forces at work in the world today, Intertel has made the first continuing contribution toward international understanding through television. In recognition, a Peabody Award.... read more

  • Off the Cuff
    1964
    Off the Cuff

    Norman Ross’ two-hour weekly Off The Cuff program seems to have disproved the contention of pessimists that television would ultimately kill off all conversation in the homes of the nation. His program whets the appetite for exchange of discussion by articulate speakers on many subjects, often esoteric and erudite, and yet brought to the level of everyday living in a stimulating and exciting manner. Norman Ross has a special gift for catalyzing these exchanges with intelligence, candor, and wit. For this unique and lively public service at the improbable hours of 12:10 AM to 2:10 AM, Monday, (actually after midnight... read more

  • Personal Award: Burr Tillstrom, “That Was the Week That Was”
    1964
    Personal Award: Burr Tillstrom, “That Was the Week That Was”

    Burr Tillstrom, in his 25th year in television, found new artistry in his haunting, sensitive interpretation of the true meaning of the Berlin Wall. Burr Tillstrom’s heart and hands portrayed the depths of the Wall’s tragic separation of families and loved ones. It left an enduring mark not only on the television screen, but also on the mind of the viewer. Mr. Tillstrom’s serious achievement was part of a weekly program, That Was the Week That Was—an uneven, unsteady program that at least tried to pierce the pompous, needle the stuffed shirt, and milk the sacred cow. We need more... read more

  • Personal Award: Joyce Hall for “Hallmark Hall of Fame”
    1964
    Personal Award: Joyce Hall for “Hallmark Hall of Fame”

    A Peabody Award goes to Joyce Hall for being television’s consistent and practical champion of the theatre, for encouraging dramatic variation and musical innovation, for presenting impeccable adaptations of literary classics as well as impressive original productions, for his 15-year support of the concept that sustained fine programming is a worthwhile investment, whether or not the “estimated audience” is relatively large—in a word, for being an enlightened patron of the television arts. In our rating book, Mr. Hall’s standing is the highest.... read more

  • Personal Award: Julia Child for “The French Chef”
    1964
    Personal Award: Julia Child for “The French Chef”

    A Peabody Award to Julia Child for her appetizing program, The French Chef, which originated in station WGBH, Boston, and is now broadcast weekly over the National Education Television network. Mrs. Child does more than show us how good cooking is achieved; by her delightful demonstrations she has brought the pleasures of good living into many American homes.... read more

  • Personal Award: William (Bill) H. Lawrence
    1964
    Personal Award: William (Bill) H. Lawrence

    A Peabody Award goes to Bill Lawrence of ABC for television news reporting. In the words of an industry authority, Bill Lawrence is a real quintuple threat man—he can write, report, speak, edit, and put it all on the air. Bill Lawrence typifies the solid corps of radio and television reporters who bring to the American public the hard news with skill and accuracy and thus have made radio and television the principal source upon which the public relies for the news. This award, therefore, is not only to Bill Lawrence for his individual excellence, but also in a representative... read more

  • Profiles In Courage
    1964
    Profiles In Courage

    A Pulitzer prize-winning book written by a President of the United States is a formidable challenge to the television producer. To Robert Saudek and his associates, and to the National Broadcasting Company, a Peabody Award for their faithful, artistic, and sensitive portrayal of some of the most moving episodes in American history. By adapting this book to the television screen, Mr. Saudek and NBC have added the vital dimensions of sight and sound to enrich the nation’s understanding of its past, and to deepen the nation’s perception of its heritage.... read more

  • Riverside Radio
    1964
    Riverside Radio

    Riverside Radio (WRVR-FM) has become one of the most influential factors in the expanding use of FM radio. It not only serves the discriminating metropolitan New York listeners, but its tapes have been used by 105 radio stations from Alaska to Florida, and by networks abroad. This process of cross-fertilization is lifting the entire moral, intellectual, and cultural levels of radio. In recognition, a Peabody Award.... read more

  • The Louvre
    1964
    The Louvre

    NBC’s color documentary, The Louvre, carried the American viewer on an exciting hour-long excursion into the world of art and history. Excellent when seen in black and white, it was the added dimension of color that truly brought the great French museum to life. Charles Boyer, with his reverent narration, was the perfect guide. Producer Lucy Jarvis and all connected with this production are worthy of Peabody commendations.... read more