The Peabody Awards

The Peabody Awards

Awards


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  • “Bob and Ray” Show
    1956
    “Bob and Ray” Show

    Once upon a time—and how astonishingly few years ago this was!—the radio comedian was the entertainer of the nation. Each hour of the night had a funnyman it could call its own. But now all this has changed; radio comedy has become a disappearing art. Disappearing, but by no means dead—and for much of the life that remains, we must thank the comedy team of Bob Elliot and Ray Goulding. Through their own show on Mutual, as well as through their appearances on NBC’s Monitor, Bob And Ray have continued to provide us with some of the finest comedy available... read more

  • Books In Profile
    1956
    Books In Profile

    In Books In Profile, which is broadcast by WNYC, New York City, Miss Virgilia Peterson, the well-known critic, author, and lecturer, provides a stimulating insight into the world of books and the persons who write them. This she does with book reviews, interviews with prominent literary personalities, and news items from publishing circles. Her program has charm, perspicacity, authority, and listener interest. In recognition of this important contribution to one of the oldest and most important of the media of communications, books, by one of the newest, radio, the George Foster Peabody Radio Award for education for 1956 goes to... read more

  • Edward P. Morgan and the News
    1956
    Edward P. Morgan and the News

    Edward P. Morgan and the News was the outstanding radio program for 1956. Mr. Morgan’s daily 15-minute program of hard news and commentary has developed a wide public acceptance because of the skill and brilliance of its presentation. Notable is the circumstance that the A.F.L.-C.I.O., as his sponsors, bring this public service to the radio audience without any suggestion of special pleading or propaganda. Mr. Morgan, as an experienced reporter, gives the news and his independent interpretations in accordance with the highest traditions of radio journalism. In recognition of all this, the George Foster Peabody Radio News Award for 1956.... read more

  • Institutional Award: ABC Television, John Charles Daly, for Television News Coverage of the National Political Convention
    1956
    Institutional Award: ABC Television, John Charles Daly, for Television News Coverage of the National Political Convention

    Last summer, the American Broadcasting Company, with department head John Daly and a carefully picked team, covered the Democratic and Republican national conventions. The result was a perfect example of how an important news event should be brought home to a television audience. Without pyrotechnics or irrelevant diversions, reporting from the floor of each convention instead of in elaborate studios behind the scenes, Daly and his lieutenants, both in front of the cameras and behind them, did precisely the jobs that had been assigned to them. The Peabody Committee salutes them individually and collectively, with a special nod to the... read more

  • Institutional Award: United Nations Radio and Television for Promotion of International Understanding
    1956
    Institutional Award: United Nations Radio and Television for Promotion of International Understanding

    For its objective and imaginative programming; and for its untiring and ingenious response during the Middle East and Hungarian crises to the requests of American broadcasters who have recognized the interest and inherent rights of the public to be informed of the United Nations’ efforts toward creating peace and international understanding, the Peabody Board has voted a Special Award to United Nations Radio and Television.... read more

  • Little Orchestra Society Concerts
    1956
    Little Orchestra Society Concerts

    With all the horrible noises, erroneously labeled music, that pollute the airwaves these days, it is a particular pleasure to salute an organization like The Little Orchestra, and its distinguished young conductor, Thomas Scherman. They are providing really beautiful music for a new generation that needs it desperately. For seven years, The Little Orchestra has broadcast six children’s concerts a season over WNYC. The same programs are now picked up by the National Association of Educational Broadcasters, and used with gratifying results by over 100 non-commercial college radio stations all over the country. Long may Mr. Scherman’s baton wave! And... read more

  • Personal Award: Jack Gould for His Outstanding Contribution to Radio and Television Through His “New York Times” Writings
    1956
    Personal Award: Jack Gould for His Outstanding Contribution to Radio and Television Through His “New York Times” Writings

    For distinguished criticism, commentary and analysis, a special George Foster Peabody Radio-TV Award is presented to Jack Gould of The New York Times. Mr. Gould’s broad knowledge of the industry and his exposure of its shortcomings as well as his recognition of its triumphs consistently encourage higher standards. He holds broadcasters and talent alike to strict account for the performance of their public and professional responsibilities. Because of his fairness, objectivity, and authority, his is a voice that is heard and respected. The arts of radio and television and the public, too, are devotedly served by this discriminating and forceful... read more

  • Personal Award: Rod Serling for “Requiem for a Heavyweight”
    1956
    Personal Award: Rod Serling for “Requiem for a Heavyweight”

    In Requiem for a Heavyweight, Rod Serling created an imaginative, live drama which was an outstanding contribution to the new art of television writing. Based on this script, Requiem for a Heavyweight became a distinguished production of the 1956 television year. In recognition of this fact, a special George Foster Peabody Award for television writing—the first such writing award in the 17-year history of the Peabody citations—is hereby presented to Mr. Serling.... read more

  • Regimented Raindrops
    1956
    Regimented Raindrops

    Combining the best techniques of radio and television, WOW of Omaha, Nebraska, with the series Regimented Raindrops, was concerned with creating an awareness of the Midwest’s water problem, and also with helping solve this problem through community action. On-the-spot interviews, dramatic documentaries, and a color film which was shared throughout the area were used in this radio-TV project of considerable local significance. This is clearly meritorious local and regional public service, and in recognition thereof, a Peabody Radio-TV Award is hereby presented.... read more

  • The Ed Sullivan Show
    1956
    The Ed Sullivan Show

    For its consistent and successful presentation of a varied diet of the popular arts—varied in the true sense of variety, from dog acts to public figures, from singers to dancers, all put forth with verve and taste and a sense of the gaiety of pleasing the viewer—the George Foster Peabody Television Award for entertainment during 1956 goes to The Ed Sullivan Show.... read more

  • The Secret Life of Danny Kaye
    1956
    The Secret Life of Danny Kaye

    The Secret Life Of Danny Kaye was produced in cooperation with the United Nations Children’s Emergency Fund in behalf of the underprivileged children of the world. This unique global television program is a saga of the joyous genius of an “ambassador extraordinary” (if Mr. Kaye will permit us to describe him as such), a saga in breaking the barriers of language and customs among the world’s children to promote the work of this United Nations agency in their behalf. With a nod to CBS and to all those who had a part in this far-reaching project, the George Foster Peabody... read more

  • World In Crisis
    1956
    World In Crisis

    To the Columbia Broadcasting System is given the George Foster Peabody Television Award for public service for its presentation of the one-hour long, full, and comprehensive visual report of the World In Crisis. In this program, as The New York Times stated, CBS “ably demonstrated what television can accomplish journalistically when it gets on with its job.” Notable was not only the short time from when the assignments were given to the actual time of broadcast, but also the geographic distances traversed and under conditions, in some instances, at real risk of life and limb. We commend CBS for the... read more

  • You are There
    1956
    You are There

    For helping to remind us that the men who made United States history did walk and talk, and think and feel, and for making the statues and portraits come briefly to life again, the George Foster Peabody Television Education Award for 1956 goes to You are There.... read more

  • Youth Wants to Know
    1956
    Youth Wants to Know

    Modeled after similar programs for adults, one of which, Meet The Press, has previously won a Peabody Award, Youth Wants To Know is a commendable response by television to its obligations to the citizens of tomorrow. In this series, panels of boys and girls question noted persons from diverse fields on subjects of current interest. Questions and questioners regularly reveal an intelligence and a development by today’s young people which are indeed heartening. Youth Wants To Know (NBC) effectively combines news, education, and entertainment, and as such, merits the George Foster Peabody Television Award for youth and children’s programs for... read more