The Peabody Awards

The Peabody Awards

Awards


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  • Ding Dong School
    1952
    Ding Dong School

    Simple, sincere, and unpretentious, this unusual example of the Chicago brand of television has achieved amazing acceptance by the nation’s preschoolers and their busy mothers. The rapid justification of Judith Waller’s faith in the television possibilities of straightforward teaching by child study expert “Miss Frances” Horwich has not only amazed the industry, but also has raised doubts about accepted notions of “what the public wants.” <p><p>... read more

  • Institutional Award: WEWS-TV for Television Local Public Service
    1952
    Institutional Award: WEWS-TV for Television Local Public Service

    Recognizing the cosmopolitan character of its community, WEWS has striven to increase harmony and understanding amid diversity by cooperating with varied racial, religious, and economic groups. In 1952 it televised more than 700 formal community service programs; it integrated public service and human relations material into many regular entertainment programs; and it drew upon a variety of religious and racial groups for talent and staff. Its daily telecourses are outstanding examples of cooperative public service. <p>... read more

  • Institutional Award: WIS Radio for Regional Public Service, Including Promotion of International Understanding
    1952
    Institutional Award: WIS Radio for Regional Public Service, Including Promotion of International Understanding

    A pioneer effort in bringing to its community the remarkably well conceived and accurate series, The United Nations Needs You, interpreting to and by its citizens the basic activities of the United Nations in understandable terms, and thereby providing a pattern for similar radio projects throughout the United States and other U.N. member states. <p>... read more

  • Meet the Press
    1952
    Meet the Press

    Co-produced by Martha Rountree and Lawrence E. Spivak, the television version of Meet the Press is an adaptation of a radio program begun in 1945 and awarded a Peabody Citation in 1946. Adding the visual to the auditory extends and strengthens the values of Meet the Press in public enlightenment. Subjecting the great and near great to expert questioning by the best reporters, this excellent program makes news as well as reports it. It is in the best tradition of a basic relationship between a free press and democracy. ... read more

  • Mister Peepers
    1952
    Mister Peepers

    The portrayal by Wally Cox, a delightful comic spirit, of Mister Peepers has brought genuine pleasure to millions of viewers. Mr. Cox achieves his comic effects, not through bombast and commotion, but quietly and subtly. He is a genuinely funny man. His comedy springs from within himself, and it is infectious. <p>... read more

  • Personal Award: Martin Agronsky for Outstanding Radio News Coverage
    1952
    Personal Award: Martin Agronsky for Outstanding Radio News Coverage

    His capacity for getting the story behind the story is distinctive. In this uneasy period of insecurity and fear, he has consistently and with rare courage given voice to the preservation of basic values in our democratic system. His penetrating analyses of highly controversial matters reflect an understanding of the fundamentals of freedom and a concern for the rights and dignity of the individual citizen. He has earned the confidence of his listeners as a skillful and competent reporter. <p>... read more

  • The Johns Hopkins Science Review
    1952
    The Johns Hopkins Science Review

    Directed by Lynn Poole, this series explains in intelligent, mature, and miraculously clear terms much of the work being carried on by outstanding scientists and teachers who, unfettered, are pursuing truth in laboratories and classrooms. The range of topics is staggering—from cancer to space ships—and the programs are invariably presented with candor, a scientific attitude, and a high degree of visual imagination. <p>... read more

  • The New York City Philharmonic Symphony Orchestra
    1952
    The New York City Philharmonic Symphony Orchestra

    For twenty-three seasons, the Sunday afternoon broadcasts of the Philharmonic from Carnegie Hall in New York have enriched the musical life of the nation, and have become as necessary and familiar a custom in millions of American homes as Sunday dinner itself.... read more

  • The Standard Symphony
    1952
    The Standard Symphony

    First, outstanding once-a-week symphonic broadcasts over 11 western states, since October 24, 1926, through which Standard Oil of California achieved a priceless public service; secondly, a radio series of highly effective educational features for school children; and, latterly, a schedule of brilliant television presentations over Pacific Coast and inter-mountain facilities, known as “The Standard Hour,” which also maintained the highest levels of production excellence.... read more

  • Victory at Sea
    1952
    Victory at Sea

    The Peabody Committee takes particular pride in making a Special Award in honor of Victory at Sea, a series dramatizing the heroism and sacrifice in the great Naval engagements of the Second World War. In terms of primacy, credit should be divided between Robert W. Sarnoff, Vice-President of NBC Film Division, for his unflagging support of such a costly project, and Henry Salomon who originated the idea and for two years dedicated himself to the writing and production of the script. The skill in selecting and editing these twenty-six superb programs shown on NBC-TV calls for tribute to the editor,... read more

  • Your Hit Parade
    1952
    Your Hit Parade

    A long merited award for consistent good taste, technical perfection, and unerring choice of performers. When a hit song must be used for as often as 16 consecutive weeks, unusual ingenuity is required to keep the program fresh and original. This is a challenge which has never once defeated Your Hit Parade, a model of charm and good taste, appealing to every age group. A credit to producers, sponsors, and the entire television industry. <p>... read more