The Peabody Awards

The Peabody Awards

Awards


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  • Amahl and the Night Visitors
    1951
    Amahl and the Night Visitors

    To Gian Carlo Menotti, for his tender and moving one-act opera, Amahl and the Night Visitors, presented for the first time anywhere last Christmas Eve over NBC-TV. Amahl and the Night Visitors was instantly received with the acclaim due a genuine work of art. It was a remarkable experience for all who had the privilege of seeing and hearing it. Its significance to television was perhaps even more imposing, since Amahl was the first operatic work ever commissioned specifically for this challenging new medium of communication. Mr. Menotti’s triumph—he not only wrote the words and music, but directed the opera... read more

  • Bob and Ray
    1951
    Bob and Ray

    A Peabody Award for entertainment in radio to Bob Elliot and Ray Goulding, those young refugees from Boston, artists with many voices at their command, who have made such an asset out of their imaginary characters, Tex and Handsome Harry Backstage, Webley Webster, Mary Magoon, and the tireless baseball scout, Steve Bosco. An average Bob and Ray broadcast, at whatever time of day—for they work, literally, morning, noon, and night—is fast moving, deadly accurate, frequently outrageous, and the most quoted—and although this is their first year of network broadcasting, they already have about them an enviable suggestion of permanence.... read more

  • Celanese Theatre
    1951
    Celanese Theatre

    An award to Celanese Theatre. Its productions of fine American plays are done with fidelity, intelligence, and scrupulous regard for the intentions of the playwright. For the first time, Celanese Theatre fused the realism and vitality of the theatre at its best with inventive camera and production techniques, revealing the limitless potentialities of television to project great drama into the American home.... read more

  • Institutional Award: KPOJ Radio,“Careers Unlimited” and “Civic Theatre on the Air,” for Meritorious Local Public Service by Radio
    1951
    Institutional Award: KPOJ Radio,“Careers Unlimited” and “Civic Theatre on the Air,” for Meritorious Local Public Service by Radio

    Through various carefully conceived and well-executed programs, KPOJ has served its community well during 1951. One of those programs, Careers Unlimited, in cooperation with the Portland Public Schools, the Exchange Club, and the Oregon State Employment Service, has done much by way of finding work for teenagers, guiding them in useful life careers, and in interesting employers in the availability of these young people. Indicative of the high quality and social usefulness of this particular program is the fact that for two years it has been rebroadcast weekly over KPBS, the school-owned station in Portland. Another instance of good local... read more

  • Institutional Award: WSB Radio and Television, “The Pastor’s Study” and “Our World Today,” for Meritorious Regional Public Service by Radio and Television
    1951
    Institutional Award: WSB Radio and Television, “The Pastor’s Study” and “Our World Today,” for Meritorious Regional Public Service by Radio and Television

    A pioneer in broadcasting, WSB has for thirty years been promoting the best interests of Atlanta, Georgia and the Southeast. With the advent of television, WSB-TV in 1948 took its place alongside WSB AM-FM and quickly became the same kind of leader in video. These stations in 1951, as in previous years, gave a practical demonstration of how radio and television can complement each other in the public interest. Because they are typical of the enterprise and originality of WSB, the Peabody Board cites The Pastor’s Study (radio) and Our World Today (television), and for the first time makes a... read more

  • Letter From America
    1951
    Letter From America

    The Peabody Award for the outstanding contribution to international understanding goes to Alistair Cooke, the American correspondent of the Manchester Guardian. In a series of short-wave broadcasts which were begun in 1946 and which now number two hundred and seventy, he has been explaining the American character, the American scene and behavior to those in Great Britain who ought to know more about us. His Letter From America is heard over BBC on Friday evenings and they are as delightful as they are penetrating. Whether he is talking about Willie Howard or Joe Lewis, or Will Rogers, the heartbeat of... read more

  • New York Times Youth Forum
    1951
    New York Times Youth Forum

    The New York Times Youth Forum has featured unrehearsed discussion by students selected from private, public and parochial schools, on topics ranging from the political, educational and scientific to the international and the United Nations. These have been broadcast not only locally, but before distinguished audiences in major American cities, coast to coast and over trans-Atlantic facilities. In recognition of the quality and importance of this series, the George Foster Peabody Award for radio youth programs is hereby awarded to WQXR of the New York Times with a special word of recognition to Dorothy Gordon, Moderator, and Mrs. Iphigene Ochs... read more

  • See It Now
    1951
    See It Now

    An award to See It Now for its simple, lucid, intelligent analysis of top news stories of the week on television. Edward R. Murrow and Fred W. Friendly have devised a strikingly effective format for presenting news and the personalities involved in the news with humor, sometimes with indignation, always with careful thought.... read more

  • The Nation’s Nightmare
    1951
    The Nation’s Nightmare

    To The Nation’s Nightmare and to CBS and to Irving Gitlin, the program’s producer—a shattering and fearless documentary series on syndicated crime in the United States. The Nation’s Nightmare was outstanding, not alone for its wealth of research, but for the manner in which the programs—dealing with traffic in narcotics, waterfront crime, the numbers racket, dishonest sports, and other national maladies—permitted the sordid facts to tell their own story, without benefit of artificial coloration. All in all, an extraordinary public service.... read more

  • What In the World
    1951
    What In the World

    To that intriguing and learned program, What In the World, presented by the University of Pennsylvania and the University Museum, over CBS-TV, for the stimulating manner in which it brings noted scholars in such fields as anthropology and art to the television screen for a delightfully entertaining and informal display of their learning. Here is superb blending of the academic and the entertaining. Watching the erudite participants on What In the World, one realizes that although a little knowledge may be a dangerous thing, a great deal of knowledge is a wonderful thing indeed.... read more