The Peabody Awards

The Peabody Awards

Awards


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  • “The Quiet Answer” for Public Service by a Regional Station
    1950
    “The Quiet Answer” for Public Service by a Regional Station

    Selecting a critical local problem as an opportunity for public service, Station WBBM sought the cooperation of sixteen major agencies and a panel of outstanding authorities in gathering the facts about tensions and conflicts in race relations in Chicago. Using tape recorded interviews as a basis, drama and music were skillfully blended in a seven-week series of hard-hitting dramatic essays titled, The Quiet Answer, which revealed to Chicagoans what they were saying, feeling, and doing. Scheduled at a season usually characterized by racial violence, the programs achieved high audience acceptance and directly stimulated improved local legislation. The careful preparation, the... read more

  • ABC, Its President, Robert E. Kintner, and his associates, Robert Saudek and Joseph McDonald for Their Courageous Stand in Resisting Organized Pressures and Their Reaffirmation of Basic American Principles
    1950
    ABC, Its President, Robert E. Kintner, and his associates, Robert Saudek and Joseph McDonald for Their Courageous Stand in Resisting Organized Pressures and Their Reaffirmation of Basic American Principles

    (Honorable Mention) At a time when radio stations and networks were either firing or refusing to hire writers and actors on the basis of the unsupported innuendoes contained in a publication known as Red Channels, Robert Kintner, president of ABC, and his associates, Robert Saudek and Joseph A. McDonald, refused to be stampeded into either action. Mr. Kintner publicly stated his faith in Gypsy Rose Lee, one of the entertainers mentioned in Red Channels, and kept her on the air despite an attempt by the American Legion to have her banned. The network, under Mr. Saudek, continued to air documentary... read more

  • Halls of Ivy
    1950
    Halls of Ivy

    The Peabody Award for Entertainment in radio goes to the Halls of Ivy of NBC because it has succeeded in mixing wit and charm with liberal and enlightened social philosophy. Its writers, Don Quinn and Walter Brown Newman, and its principal actors, Mr. and Mrs. Ronald Colman, have demonstrated that radio comedy can be successful even at the risk of being intelligent.... read more

  • Hear It Now
    1950
    Hear It Now

    (Honorable Mention) Here was a brilliant application of tape-recording to the purpose of the news summary, by which the listener is privileged to hear the news from the very individuals who made it. The accolade in this case goes to the many network stations, to CBS staff members, and the skilled top engineers who together have edited and made possible the vivid Hear It Now.... read more

  • Institutional Award: Radio Free Europe for Contribution to International Understanding
    1950
    Institutional Award: Radio Free Europe for Contribution to International Understanding

    An award for the promotion of international understanding goes to Radio Free Europe, a private organization unhampered by public or state policies (that) has done a magnificent job penetrating the Iron Curtain with the message of democracy. More importantly, it is striving for and we hope succeeding in educating the populace of the Communist-dominated areas in joining the fight against tyranny.... read more

  • Institutional Award: WFPL-FM Radio for Public Service by a Local Station
    1950
    Institutional Award: WFPL-FM Radio for Public Service by a Local Station

    (Honorable Mention) A citation for outstanding public service by a local station goes to WFPL-FM, operated by the Louisville, Kentucky Free Public Library, which since it first went on the air February 18, 1950, has extended the cultural resources of the Library to school and home alike, and in so doing has set a pattern which may well be emulated by both commercial and educational stations.... read more

  • Institutional Award: WNYC Radio for Contribution to International Understanding for United Nations Coverage
    1950
    Institutional Award: WNYC Radio for Contribution to International Understanding for United Nations Coverage

    (Honorable Mention) A citation for the promotion of international understanding to station WNYC of the City of New York, for its public service in bringing the official daily proceedings of the United Nations to those in the metropolitan area, and for its consistent UN news coverage and frequent presentation of feature material about the United Nations, in their struggle to bring about lasting peace.... read more

  • Metropolitan Opera
    1950
    Metropolitan Opera

    This year the Committee is proud to make the award in music to the Metropolitan Opera Company, to its sponsor, the Texaco Company, and to ABC for their public service in making the most brilliant opera company in the world a by-word in millions of homes. It is a joy to hear the great artists and the superlative orchestra; the intermission notes enlarge the appreciation of old and young, and so do the satellite programs, such as the Auditions of the Air, and the Opera Album. In this year, a special word of praise for the sumptuous televising by ABC... read more

  • Mutual Broadcasting System and United Nations Radio for Contribution to International Understanding “Pursuit of Peace”
    1950
    Mutual Broadcasting System and United Nations Radio for Contribution to International Understanding “Pursuit of Peace”

    (Honorable Mention) A Citation to the Mutual Broadcasting System and United Nations Radio for the significant series of hour- long documentary programs, The Pursuit of Peace, which delineated to listeners the world-wide scope of man’s international undertakings for the benefit of his fellowmen, and particularly, for the premiere program, Document A/777, which dramatized the historical background and implications of the United Nations declaration on human rights.... read more

  • Personal Award: Elmer Davis for Reporting and Interpretation of News
    1950
    Personal Award: Elmer Davis for Reporting and Interpretation of News

    The Peabody Award for the best reporting and interpretation of the news goes for the third time to Elmer Davis. In a year of great anxiety and bitter partisanship, it has been reassuring and edifying to hear the sanity, the horse sense, and that dry Hoosier wit with which Mr. Davis contemplates a troubled world. To his broadcasts, he brings diligence, integrity, and a writing skill unmatched in radio today. You now have three legs on this trophy, Mr. Davis, and if you keep on the way you are going, we will have to give you permanent possession of it.... read more

  • Personal Award: Ira Hirschmann for Entertainment (Music)
    1950
    Personal Award: Ira Hirschmann for Entertainment (Music)

    (Honorable Mention) A citation in the field of music goes to Ira A. Hirschmann, president of Station WABF-FM in New York City, for the integrity of his musical presentations during a year when many lovers of music felt that radio had forgotten their needs; for making it possible to hear hour upon hour the finest in fine music with only the barest of interruptions; for creating, in WABF, a unique, relaxing, and reliable treasure house.... read more

  • Personal Award: Jimmy Durante
    1950
    Personal Award: Jimmy Durante

    An award for the best entertainment in television goes to Jimmy Durante. By the sheer impact of his irresistible personality, Jimmy Durante scattered to the winds the stale formulas and dreary routines that were threatening to put television into the same strait jacket that has restricted so-called comedy programs in radio. Durante’s warmth, sincerity, and whole-hearted joy in what he is doing have done more to raise the spirits of television audiences than any single program in the memory of the Peabody Award Committee.... read more

  • Providence Journal, Its Editor and Publisher, Sevellon Brown, and Ben Bagdikian, Reporter for the Series of Articles Analyzing the Broadcasts of Top Commentators
    1950
    Providence Journal, Its Editor and Publisher, Sevellon Brown, and Ben Bagdikian, Reporter for the Series of Articles Analyzing the Broadcasts of Top Commentators

    (Honorable Mention) To the Providence, (R.I.) Journal, to Sevellon Brown, editor and publisher, and to a brilliant young reporter, Ben Bagdikian, who in a series of lively articles carried out the most exacting, thorough and readable check-up of broadcasts by Walter Winchell, Drew Pearson and Fulton Lewis, Jr. Radio has a constant need of good critics. Here was criticism of the very highest order, and as readable as it was accurate.... read more

  • Saturday at the Zoo and Zoo Parade
    1950
    Saturday at the Zoo and Zoo Parade

    A joint award for two similar programs, each consistently informative and remarkably entertaining, one a television visit to the Lincoln Park Zoo, Chicago, the other to the Bronx Zoo, New York City, which have given children (and their parents) an opportunity to become acquainted with the personalities and characteristics of the zoos’ large, varied, and international population. The programs are also recognized for their excellent background material and the astute comments which are parts of both programs. (Other recipient is NBC Television for Zoo Parade.)... read more

  • The Johns Hopkins Science Review
    1950
    The Johns Hopkins Science Review

    (Honorable Mention) Skillfully simplifying and visualizing the results of scientific research in varied fields, The Johns Hopkins Science Review brings education to the layman in an interesting and attractive manner. It is convincing proof that learning need not be dull. It demonstrates that teamwork among an educational institution; a commercial station and a network can make possible a wide dissemination of significant scholarship. As the pioneer university network series it should stimulate a steady advance in the art of educational television.... read more

  • The Quick and the Dead
    1950
    The Quick and the Dead

    To The Quick and the Dead, National Broadcasting Company, the George Foster Peabody Award for education in recognition of the success of this series in simplifying and dramatizing a difficult technical subject and in dwelling on the good as well as the evil that lies in the conquest of nuclear energy—with a special word of praise for William Laurence of The New York Times, who brought to this program a wide knowledge and long experience in popularizing science; for Bob Hope and the players who interpreted the drama of the atom bomb; and for William F. Brooks and Fred Friendly... read more

  • Zoo Parade and Saturday at the Zoo
    1950
    Zoo Parade and Saturday at the Zoo

    A joint award for two similar programs, each consistently informative and remarkably entertaining, one a television visit to the Lincoln Park Zoo, Chicago, the other to the Bronx Zoo, New York City, which have given children (and their parents) an opportunity to become acquainted with the personalities and characteristics of the zoos’ large, varied, and international population. The programs are also recognized for their excellent background material and the astute comments which are parts of both programs. (Other recipient is ABC Television for Saturday at the Zoo.) ... read more