The Peabody Awards

The Peabody Awards

Awards


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  • “Forests Aflame” for Outstanding Public Service by a Regional Station
    1948
    “Forests Aflame” for Outstanding Public Service by a Regional Station

    During the period of greatest forest fire danger, radio station KNBC, San Francisco, produced nine weekly dramatic programs, Forests Aflame, containing a vital message on conservation. Important as was the subject matter, the effectiveness of the presentation, from radio’s point of view, was even more significant. Those were not sermons. They were primarily programs of entertainment, designed to appeal to a wide audience: all of those who would be traveling in the forest areas of the West, and any one of whom might be the very person to whom this warning should be directed. Each program was a self-contained story.... read more

  • “Youth and You” for Outstanding Public Service by a Regional Station
    1948
    “Youth and You” for Outstanding Public Service by a Regional Station

    With the public service program, You And Youth, radio station WDAR has not only contributed wisely and helpfully to problems of juvenile delinquency, but has provided a program pattern which has attracted much favorable notice over a wide area, and which can, with profit, be studied and adapted by other broadcasters. In the language of Focus, official organ of the National Probation and Parole Association, “When the report of a probation department arouses the interest of the press, it must be newsworthy. When radio commentators digress from rumors of war to talk about a case history, the report must be... read more

  • Actor’s Studio
    1948
    Actor’s Studio

    An Award was presented for the first time at this luncheon to a television program—Actor’s Studio—for its “uninhibited and brilliant pioneering in the field of televised drama.” This program, guided by John Steinbeck, Elia Kazan, and Cheryl Crawford, and produced by Don Davis, has, according to the citation, presented one-act plays, short stories and sketches whose acting, direction, lighting and production show the highest degree of skill and resourcefulness. In the opinion of the judges, Actor’s Studio is the first to recognize that drama on television is neither a stage play nor a movie, but a separate and distinct new... read more

  • Communism, U.S. Brand
    1948
    Communism, U.S. Brand

    The Award for the outstanding educational program goes to Robert M. Saudek, Vice-President in charge of public affairs of ABC, in appreciation of his documentary program, Communism, U.S. Brand. This was first broadcast on August 2, 1948, and was repeated six days later in response to the immediate popular demand. Dramatic in form, it explained without exaggeration what Communism is and how it infiltrates and operates within our country. The action throughout was commented on by an interpolated voice which always introduced himself as a footnote—an original and effective device. In substance and performance, this program raised the documentary to... read more

  • Howdy Doody
    1948
    Howdy Doody

    The Peabody Award for a children’s program establishes a noteworthy precedent this year by going to a television feature: Howdy Doody. This beguiling puppet show, televised by NBC, has, in a brief span of time, devised a formula that is frequently educational, never frightening or offensive, and invariably hailed with rapture by children themselves. Expose your own children just once to Howdy Doody and try to keep them away from it the next evening! ... read more

  • Institutional Award: CBS Radio for “Memo From Lake Success,” “Between the Dark and Daylight,” “U.N. in Action,” “Crusade for Children”
    1948
    Institutional Award: CBS Radio for “Memo From Lake Success,” “Between the Dark and Daylight,” “U.N. in Action,” “Crusade for Children”

    To the Columbia Broadcasting System for its work in the promotion of international understanding, as exemplified by the objectivity of CBS news correspondents and analysts throughout the world; by United Nations broadcasts in the interests of international relief as Between the Dark and Daylight, U.N. In Action and Crusade For Children; and by such special programs as As Others See Us, An American Abroad and Memo From Lake Success.... read more

  • Little Songs About U.N.
    1948
    Little Songs About U.N.

    (Honorable Mention) A special citation to WNEW for their initiative in creating Little Songs About U.N., thus utilizing an unusual broadcasting technique in the interest of international understanding and for their generosity in presenting to United Nations Radio one thousand copies for distribution to broadcasters in the English speaking countries.... read more

  • Lowell Institute Cooperative Broadcasting: Institutional Award for Outstanding Education Program
    1948
    Lowell Institute Cooperative Broadcasting: Institutional Award for Outstanding Education Program

    (Honorable Mention) Under the inspiration and practical guidance of Parker Wheatley, the Institute has recruited the ablest teachers and scholars from the many colleges and universities of Greater Boston and in a series of invigorating programs has made an enormous advance in adult education through the medium of broadcasting. This is an example worth watching by other college and metropolitan communities.... read more

  • NBC Radio, “The Orchestras of the Nation,” “The First Piano Quartet,” “The Boston Symphony Rehearsals,” for Outstanding Entertainment in Music
    1948
    NBC Radio, “The Orchestras of the Nation,” “The First Piano Quartet,” “The Boston Symphony Rehearsals,” for Outstanding Entertainment in Music

    The award for outstanding entertainment in music goes to the National Broadcasting Company, a network which early recognized the need for special instruments and special programs in classical music. In 1937, NBC established its symphony orchestra and called to the podium the greatest of European conductors, Maestro Toscanini. In 1943, NBC originated the First Piano Quartet, a quartet, whether on tour or in its studio, which has played to packed houses and to the listening millions from coast to coast. In 1944, NBC took its third forward step when it presented The Orchestra of the Nation, a program which gave... read more

  • NBC University Theatre
    1948
    NBC University Theatre

    An award to the NBC University Theatre, an hour’s dramatization of some of our finest novels and short stories launched as an experiment in July, 1948. The response to the first five performances, which included A Farewell To Arms, by Ernest Hemingway, Noon Wine, by Katherine Anne Porter, and Main Street, by Sinclair Lewis, was so vociferous that the network pocketed any misgivings it may have had, moved the show to a more desirable hour, and found the actors and the funds to sustain a series of absorbing and skillfully adapted programs.... read more

  • Personal Award: Edward R. Murrow for Outstanding Reporting and Interpretation of the News
    1948
    Personal Award: Edward R. Murrow for Outstanding Reporting and Interpretation of the News

    The Peabody Award for outstanding reporting and interpretation of the news goes to Edward R. Murrow of CBS. For more than a decade, Ed Murrow has been one of the most reliable and shining lights in the overcast of news analysis. In 1938, he formed his network’s crack European staff. During the five war years, his own broadcasts beginning, This Is London, made radio history with their firm and incisive quality; and to the immense delight of his listeners, after a brief bout of administrative duty, he returned to the air again to tell us the news without fear and... read more

  • Radio Stations of the Mountain and Plain States Institutional Award for Rendering Highly Important Service During the 1948 Blizzard
    1948
    Radio Stations of the Mountain and Plain States Institutional Award for Rendering Highly Important Service During the 1948 Blizzard

    (Honorable Mention) During this season’s unprecedented severe winter in Western America, the radio stations of the mountain and plain states “distinguished themselves by rendering highly important service to the many isolated communities,” Chairman Weeks said. Transportation by rail and highway was completely stopped by the heavy snows and high winds. Thousands of travelers were stranded in areas without adequate living facilities. Great flocks of sheep and herds of cattle were threatened with starvation. Radio stations in the stricken area gave liberally of their time and facilities and were highly cooperative in aiding authorities to meet the difficult situation. Relief procedures... read more

  • Rocky Mountain Radio Council Institutional Award for Outstanding Education Program
    1948
    Rocky Mountain Radio Council Institutional Award for Outstanding Education Program

    (Honorable Mention) Organized in 1939, the Rocky Mountain Radio Council has, during the past decade, demonstrated most effectively how broadcasters utilizing the unlimited resources of colleges, schools, libraries, women’s clubs, farm groups and the like, can be of great public service. Brought into being to unite two powerful interests—commercial radio and education—with the objective of mutual growth and significance, this Council has done much to lift education on the air to a higher level of effectiveness, and commercial broadcasting to a similar high level of public interest and service. In recognition, thereof, this special George Foster Peabody Citation for outstanding... read more

  • You Bet Your Life
    1948
    You Bet Your Life

    Groucho (Marx), in his quiz show with its delightful revelation of American innocence, is the only man on the air who can work without a script and bat off a brilliant succession of witticisms. He plays rough but his victims come off the mat with a grin because of the completely unexpected quality of Groucho’s cracks. He is the Dean of all wise-crackers in the country. ... read more